Meet the Pigs

Pigs are utterly charming animals.

 
They are curious, playful, and possess high levels of intelligence, both cerebral and emotional.

Despite these qualities, commercially bred pigs suffer through lifelong confinement with the especially cruel use of gestation crates. Gestation crates are barren and immobilizing pens. They force mothers to spend most of their lives lying on their sides and prevent them from fully nurturing their young.

Although pigs can live up to 20 years, commercially bred pigs live significantly shorter lives. When farmed for meat, they are usually slaughtered at around only six months of age. If used for reproduction, they are killed after 1.5-2 years.

Jimmy

Jimmy was CHF’s first resident, joining us when he was just 5-months old.

Since the sanctuary was still being built, Jimmy lived in the house with Rick and Carolyn. At first, it was a little tricky with the cats and dogs. But once he showed them how he could open the pantry and refrigerator—it was love.

Poor Jimmy was discovered in some woods where a passerby found him lying near his dead mother and littermates. He was the sole survivor.

We believe he is part factory farm pig and part wild boar. Jimmy now lives in a luxury piggie townhouse with a beautiful pasture and a large mud pool where he spends his days grazing and his nights snuggled up with his best friend, Willie.

Found abandoned and suffering from a broken leg that had never been set, Willie spent time in foster care before arriving at CHF.

The plan was for Willie to undergo swim therapy to heal his broken leg, but…

This little buster boy wasn’t all that interested in cooperating, so he opted out 😉

Fortunately, his leg healed very well on its own, and he can run and play with the best of them!

You’ll now see Willie romping around or lounging in the mud pit together with his pasture mate and lifelong pal Jimmy.

Yep, Willie has got it made here at CHF, and we are no less than truly blessed to have him as part of our family!

Willie

Willie

Found abandoned and suffering from a broken leg that had never been set, Willie spent time in foster care before arriving at CHF.

The plan was for Willie to undergo swim therapy to heal his broken leg, but…

This little buster boy wasn’t all that interested in cooperating, so he opted out 😉

Fortunately, his leg healed very well on its own, and he can run and play with the best of them!

You’ll now see Willie romping around or lounging in the mud pit together with his pasture mate and lifelong pal Jimmy.

Yep, Willie has got it made here at CHF, and we are no less than truly blessed to have him as part of our family!

Sunshine

In yet another backyard operation, sweet Sunshine was being used as a “breeder” pig.

Sadly, after so many cycles of birth, she fell victim to uterine prolapse, a not uncommon effect of being forced to breed repeatedly.

Sunshine desperately needed medical intervention, but the folks who were keeping her could not afford the surgery. That’s when we stepped in and whisked her to the University of Tennessee School of Veterinary Medicine, where she received the top-notch care she deserved.

Sunshine has since returned three times for follow-up procedures and still battles some ongoing issues due to the unfortunate consequences of the abuse she suffered.

Today, she is one of the happiest members of our family and expresses her bliss most unabashedly at mealtime! You should see her grin and eat!

Dear Willow (formerly Wilbur) came to us from a teaching school that included activities related to farming.

When this charter school lost its funding, it had to send the animals elsewhere.

A young student named Ben had come to love Willow. He wanted to see that she had the chance to live out her life with care and in safety.

And so, after a long journey from Indiana (in the back of a minivan no less!), 400-pound Willow found her way to Changing Hearts Farm, where she now serves as somewhat of a mascot.

Willow wanders the property freely and loves to interact with all who come to visit, especially if they’re willing to indulge her in one of her favorite activities—the belly rub 😊.

Willow

Willow

Dear Willow (formerly Wilbur) came to us from a teaching school that included activities related to farming.

When this charter school lost its funding, it had to send the animals elsewhere.

A young student named Ben had come to love Willow. He wanted to see that she had the chance to live out her life with care and in safety.

And so, after a long journey from Indiana (in the back of a minivan no less!), 400-pound Willow found her way to Changing Hearts Farm, where she now serves as somewhat of a mascot.

Willow wanders the property freely and loves to interact with all who come to visit, especially if they’re willing to indulge her in one of her favorite activities—the belly rub 😊.

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